THE DORIA PAMPHILJ GALLERY IN ROME by Caterina Stringhetta

The palace, still belonging to the Doria Pamphilj family, is situated along via del Corso and its Gallery houses one of the richest private collection of paintings, furniture and statues in Rome.
The 
Doria Pamphilj family had a lot of renowned members, who were the main characters of Italian history.

In 1647 Camillo Pamphiliji renounced his title of cardinal, which had been offered him by his uncle, Pope Innocenzo X, three years before. His rejection was due to love. He defied his powerful uncle and his frightful mother in order to marry Olimpia Aldobrandini. Camillo and Olimpia joined the two most important families in Rome and, what is more, joined a huge inheritance. 

Olimpia was the sole heir of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, Pope Clemente VIII’s nephew (1592-1605), and in 1638 she inherited the family’s palace together with the art collection. The collection included works of art by Titian Vecellio, Raphael Sanzio and other very important pieces of Renaissance art.
Camillo, instead, began increasing the small Pamphilj collection, in order to emulate his wife’s, and he succeeded in it. The collection is still one of the most important in Italy. Camillo himself became a purchaser. He bought works of art by Bernini, Borromini, Pietro da Cortona and many others. He developed a great passion for foreign painters, especially for Flemish painters.

The entrance of the Doria Pamphilj  Gallery is situated in Via del Corso 3015, only a short distance from Piazza Venezia.

On foot.

The Doria Pamphilj  Gallery is a short distance from the main palces of artistc and historic interest in the centre of Rome.

From Pantheon follow Via della Minerva and then Via del Piè di Marmo until reaching Piazza del Collegio Romano.
From the Trevi Fountain follow Via delle Muratte to where it intersects with Via del Corso, then proceed for 300 metres toward Piazza Venezia.

By Underground.

Line A: the closest station is Piazza Berberini and then walk to Piazza Venezia.
Line B: the closest station is Colosseo and then walk to Piazza Venezia.

Guest Post by Caterina Stringhetta  

    

Caterina lives near Venice and she is a curious tourist, fond of art cities, a tireless visitor to exhibitions, and an insatiable explorer of museumsShe has a degree in art history, but she’s more interested in stories which art talks about. The Art post Blog is her blog, born in 2013 to share her passion for art.

READ ALSO THE ART POST BLOG: Things to see in Rome

 

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